INFORMATION FOR PARENTS

Frequently Asked Questions

On this page we endeavour to answer all the questions you have about Competitive Swimming. If you have an unanswered question after checking out the information here then please EMAIL WEB MANAGER and we will get the answer published here for you!

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Click on each question to expand for the answer – click again to close

Acronyms & Terminology (1)

Frequently used acronyms & swimming terminology

FREQUENTLY USED ACRONYMS AND TERMINOLOGY

  • ASA: Amateur Swimming Association, the governing body of British swimming. Link to ASA website
  • Age Group: Division of swimmers according to age, usually in one or two year bands.
  • Anchor: The final swimmer in a relay.
  • Back Up Time: The time given to a swimmer when they fail to stop the electronic timing by hitting the timing pad hard enough or the pad fails to record a time. The back up time is initiated by the time keeper pressing a button when the swimmer finishes the race.
  • BAGCATS: British Age Group Categories are a point-based system operated by the ASA. Their objective is to encourage development across multiple strokes and distances for girls under 14 and boys under 15 and to discourage specialisation at too early a stage in a swimmer’s career
  • Beep: The starting sound made from an electronic timing system
  • Blocks: The starting platforms which are located behind each lane.
  • Club Championship: A swimming competition open to all members of the club regardless of their age or experience.
  • Closing Date: The last date when entries into a competition have to be received by the club in order to send them to the Meet Organiser. Entries will not be accepted after the closing date
  • CQT: County Qualifying Time.
  • Course: The length of pool: Long Course = 50 metres / Short Course = 25 metres.
  • Disqualified: The swimmers performance in an event is not counted because they breached the rules.

Distances:

    • Short Courses Distances
      25 metres = 1 length
      50 metres = 2 lengths
      100 metres = 4 lengths
      200 metres = 8 lengths
      400 metres = 10 lengths
      800 metres = 32 lengths
      1500 metres = 60 lengths
    • Long Course Distances
      50 metres = 1 length
      100 metres = 2 lengths
      200 metres = 4 lengths
      400 metres = 8 lengths
      800 metres = 16 lengths
      1500 metres = 30 lengths
  • Electronic Timing: A timing system that is operated electronically which normally has touch pads in the water that hook up to a computer and records the swimmers split and finish times when they touch the pad.
  • Eligible to compete: The status of a member swimmer that means they are registered with the ASA and have met all the entry requirements.
  • Entry Fees: The amount per event a swimmer or relay is charged. This varies depending on the type of meet.
  • Entry Limit: Normally meets have a maximum number of swimmers they can accept for each race
  • Event: A race.
  • FINA: Federation Internationale de National de Amateur, the international governing body of competitive swimming, diving, water polo and synchronized swimming.
  • False start: When a swimmer leaves the starting block or moves on the block before the starter has started the race. The swimmer will be disqualified for making a false start.
  • Faulty Start: When a swimmer or swimmers leave the starting block because of an error of an official or failure of the starting equipment.
  • Final: The championship final of an event in which the fastest eight swimmers from the heats or semi-finals compete.
  • Fins: Rubber training fins worn on the feet designed to help develop kick and ankle flexibility
  • Flags: The flags / pennants that are suspended over the width of each end of the pool. These are designed to assist backstroke swimmers to determine how far away the end of the pool is.
  • Free: Freestyle is a category of stroke defined by the FINA rules , in which competitors are subject to only limited restrictions on their swimming stroke. (In other words, they have great freedom with respect to their swimming style.) The stroke used almost universally in freestyle races is the front crawl, as this style is generally the fastest.
  • Gallery: The spectator viewing area.
  • Goals: Short, Medium and Long term targets for the swimmers to aim for
  • Heats: When an event has too many swimmers to allow them to all compete at the same time. The swimmers are split into heats and then the overall results for the event are given after all heats of the event are finished.
  • IM: Individual Medley, The swimmer uses all four competitive strokes in the order: butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and freestyle.
  • Kick Board: A flotation device used by swimmers during training when swimming with legs only.
  • Kick: The leg movements of a swimmer.
  • Late Entries: Meet entries from a club or individual which are received by the meet host after the entry deadline. These entries are usually not accepted and are returned to sender.
  • Leg: The part of a relay event swum by a single team member.
  • Log Book: A personal log book kept by the swimmer including information on training sessions and personal best times.
  • Long Course: A 50 metre pool.
  • Marks: The command to take your starting position.
  • Meet: A series of events held in one programme. Also known as a Gala.
  • NQT: National Qualifying Time
  • NTR: No Time Recorded. The abbreviation used on a heat sheet to show that the swimmers time was not officially recorded.
  • Nationals: ASA senior, junior and age group meets conducted each year.
  • Novice: A beginner or someone who does not have experience.
  • OT Official Time: The swimmers event time recorded to one hundredth of a second (.01).
  • Official: A judge on the poolside. The judges have a variety of roles, including an official starter and also lane judges monitor the swimmer’s strokes, turns and finishes.
  • Open Competition: Meet Competition which any qualified club, organisation, or individual may enter.
  • Over the Top Start: At some meets and galas for Front Crawl (Freestyle), Breaststroke and Butterfly races to save time the swimmers will remain in the water after their event until the next race starts.
  • PB Personal Best - The best time a swimmer has done so far in each stroke and distance.
  • Pace Clock: The large clock at the end of the pool so the swimmers can check their times during warm-ups or swim practice.
  • Paddles: Hand paddles are devices worn by swimmers during training. They consist of a curved plastic plate worn over the swimmer’s palm and attached over the back of the swimmer’s hand with elastic cords. The plate is often perforated with a pattern of holes. These give the swimmer considerably more forward propulsion from the arm stroke than the hand can give alone.
  • Pull Buoy: A pull buoy or leg float is a figure-eight shaped piece of foam used in training. Swimmers place the buoy between the legs – either between their thighs or their ankles to provide support to the body without kicking the legs. This allows the swimmer to focus on training only their arms and developing both endurance and upper body strength.
  • Qualifying Time: Times Published times necessary to enter most Open Meets, and all County, District and National competitions. Some competitions will have upper and lower qualifying times.
  • Referee: The head official at a swim meet.
  • Registered: Swimmers register with the ASA to be able to participate in competitive swimming meets.
  • Relays: A swimming event in which 4 swimmers participate as a relay team and each swimmer swims an equal distance of the race.
  • Scratch: To withdraw from an event after having declared an intention to participate.
  • Seed: The swimmers are assigned heats and lanes according to their submitted PB times.
  • Senior Meet: A meet that is for senior level swimmers and is not divided into age groups. Qualification times are usually necessary and will vary depending on the level of the meet.
  • Set: Swim workouts are divided up into sets of swims in a particular stroke, style, and distance, such as kick sets, pull sets, Distance sets, sprint sets, IM sets, etc. Sets are given in terms of the distance to be swum, calculated in metres.
  • Short Course: A 25 metre pool.
  • Split Time: A swimmer’s intermediate time in a race. Splits are registered every 25 or 50 metres depending upon the distance of the race and are used to determine if the swimmer is swimming at the correct pace.
  • Step-Down: The command given by the Starter or Referee to have the swimmers step down and move off the blocks.
  • Submitted Time: Times used to enter swimmers in meets. These times must normally have been achieved by the swimmer at a prior meets. For County, Regional/District & National championships the submitted times must be achieved in Designated Meets
  • Time Trials: An event or series of events where a swimmer records their times in order to improve on personal best times and achieve qualifying times for entry to events.
  • Touch Pad: The removable plate (on the end of pools) which is connected to an automatic timing system. A swimmer must firmly touch the touch pad for it to register their official time in a race.
  • Training Kit Click here for details of the training kit used: Training Kit
  • Training Tips Click here for our top 20 training tips! Training Tips!
  • Whipping Area: A room or area on or near the pool side for the swimmers to muster before they compete in a race

Club information (8)

How do I join Portsmouth Northsea?

Easy – come and have a try out! Check out the squad pages for the criteria you need to meet for each level, then contact us to arrange your trial session.

Contact us

General Enquiries:admin@pnsc.org.uk

Head Coach:paul.hogg@pnsc.org.uk

Chairman:chairman@pnsc.org.uk

Not ready to join a squad yet? We also offer swimming lessons

Contact lee.baldwin@pnsc.org.uk

Phone: 07780 902759

What is the club squad structure?

SQUAD STRUCTURE

Click on each section of the pyramid for a link to the relevant Squad information

876AGEGROUPP54321

 

MASTERSTRI

What do the Committee Members do?

The Committee Members do a lot behind the scenes to support the club – check out the committee member role guides for all the details

Committee Role Guides

How can I support the club?

How you can Support your Club

VOLUNTEERS

The club is always looking for parents to volunteer, be it as part of the Committee or supporting Open Meets and competitions.

Roles are varied and you will be provided training and support.

If you have some time to support the club please contact Our Workforce Co-ordinator Sara Metcalfe or email admin@pnsc.org.uk

VOLUNTEER ROLES

  • Offical Timekeeper
  • Official Judge
  • Official Starter
  • Official Referee
  • Gala – Meet Manager
  • Gala – Announcer
  • Gala – Recorders
  • Gala – Runners
  • Gala – Door Money & Programme Sales
  • Gala – Marshall / Steward
  • Gala – Raffle Organiser
  • Gala – Medals

COMMITTEE ROLES

Committee Role Guides

Nutrition (2)

What should I eat on a competition day?

NUTRITION

NUTRITION ADVICE PROVIDED BY THE ASA

When preparing to compete at a swimming competition you need to pay careful attention to what you eat. Read on to find out what to eat the day before the event and during the day.

The Day Before

When competition time comes round, you’ll have plenty on your mind already. So the day before the event, keep exercise to a minimum – if anything at all – and eat meals and snacks high in complex carbohydrates. You need to keep those glycogen stores topped up.

  • Drink fluids little and often to stay properly hydrated.
  • Eat little and often – every two to four hours to keep your blood sugar levels steady and fuel your muscles in preparation for your event.
  • Avoid big meals or over-eating in the evening – this will almost certainly make you feel uncomfortable and lethargic the next day.
  • Try to stick to familiar foods. Curries, spicy foods, baked beans and pulses (unless you are used to eating them) can cause gas and bloating, so avoid eating anything that may cause stomach discomfort the next day. It’s best to stick to foods that you are familiar and compatible with!

The Morning of the Event

  • Don’t swim on empty. Even if you feel nervous, make breakfast happen. Stick to easily digested foods – cereal with milk, porridge, banana with yoghurt, some fruit or toast with jam.
  • If you’re really struggling, try liquid meals such as milkshakes, yoghurt drinks or a smoothie.
  • It’s a good idea to rehearse your competition meal routine in training so you know exactly what agrees with you.

Snacks Between Heats

  • Try to eat as soon as possible after your swim to give yourself as long as possible to recover if you have to swim again.
  • High fat and simple sugar foods will do you no favours in competition – instead search out the complex carbohydrates again.
  • If you can’t stomach anything solid try sports drinks, flavoured milk or diluted juice that will help replenish your energy supplies and assist the recovery of aching muscles.

 

The list below offers great food options to be snacking on in and around training for a competition. Remember to keep eating healthy foods from your regular diet though, such as fresh vegetables, nuts and fruits.

Here are some more you can try

  • water, diluted fruit juice with a pinch of salt or a sports drink
  • Pasta salad
  • Plain sandwiches e.g. chicken, tuna, cheese with salad, banana, peanut butter
  • Bananas, grapes, apples, plums, pears
  • Dried fruit e.g. raisins, apricots, mango
  • Smoothies
  • Crackers and rice cakes with bananas and/or honey
  • Mini-pancakes, fruit buns
  • Cereal bars, fruit bars, sesame snaps
  • Yoghurt and yoghurt drinks
  • Small bags of unsalted nuts e.g. peanuts, cashews, almonds
  • Prepared vegetable crudités e.g. carrots, peppers, cucumber and celery

 

What should competitive swimmers eat?

NUTRITION

Don’t forget nutrition is key to your performance!

 

GENERAL NUTRITION FOR COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS PROVIDED BY THE ASA

Exercise Meals
If you’re planning to go swimming or training later in the day try to eat an exercise-friendly meal two and three hours before you go. This means keeping your carbohydrate and protein levels high on roughly a 60:40 ratio and don’t pig out on sluggish unsaturated fats.
Here are some good examples:
• Baked potatoes – fill them with beans, sweet corn or chilli, not too much cheese, and remember to eat the skin, it’s the healthiest bit!.
• Pasta meals or bakes – again go light on the cheese, throw in plenty of vegetables. Tuna is also a great energy source.
• Beans on toast – they may be the signature of a student’s staple diet but low-sugar baked beans are actually really good for you. Bags of protein in the beans and wholemeal toast has your complex carbohydrates. And if beans aren’t your thing, eggs will do a similar job.
• Chilli con carne – beans, lean mince, and brown rice all should set you up perfectly for exercise in a few hours. Fatty, greasy mince, white rice and salty tortilla chips will not.
Pre-training Snacks
• Unless you’re trying to lose body fat don’t train on an empty stomach, you’ll be running on empty and your performance will be impaired. Eat a small meal or snack between one and two hours before you start your training.
• Great snacking foods are fruits (fresh is best but dried are still okay), energy foods (cereal bars, energy drinks, protein shakes), yogurt (low fat if possible) or whole grain foods (whole wheat cereal or wholemeal toast).
Snacking During the Day
• Elite athletes keep their blood sugar level as constant as possible by snacking regularly (and healthily) during the day.
• Only do this if you’re training enough not to add body weight from the increased food/calorie intake.
• Target the same snacks you would as a pre-training boost – complex carbohydrates, fruits or protein shakes.
Refuelling
• If you’re putting in the metres in the pool, your body will need a boost when you finish your training.
• Always try to refuel within 30 minutes of finishing and preferably within 15 minutes – your body immediately needs nutrients to repair muscles and replace energy.
• Make sure you’re refuelling with the ‘right’ foods though – something low in fat but high in carbohydrates and protein.

Swimmers information (15)

How can I keep a record of my swimming achievements?

Download a copy of the Junior Swimmers Log Book pop it in a folder and fill it in every time you have a swimming session!

What is ‘Masters’ swimming?

Masters swimming is basically swimming for adults.
Find out more here About Masters Swimming

Parents Guide to entering meets

Parent and Swimmer guide to Meet Entries

1. All entry forms MUST be handed into the office by the closing date specified. NO late entries will be accepted, please familiarise yourself with the competition calendar so you have a rough idea of which meets your swimmer is likely to compete in.

2. Correct entry fee is paid at the time you submit you entry form – if this is incorrect then entry will be rejected.

3. Entry forms MUST be completed correctly including DOB and ASA number

4. It is the responsibility of the PARENT/SWIMMER to ensure correct times are entered on the form. The Admin Team will accept NO responsibility for incorrect times being entered by parents/swimmers that result in the rejection of the entry and/ or losing entry fee.

5. Always READ IN FULL the Promotions Conditions BEFORE you enter a meet. These give you the full qualifying criteria that your swimmer has to meet. There are many more conditions of entry than just the qualifying time, for example a qualifying window (dates when the qual time must have been achieved between), age of swimmer (either at end of year or on last day of competition) as examples.

6. Protection and Health and Safety Guidelines. The swimmers need to sit with the coaches so that they are ready for their races and the coach will then be able to prepare them for the race.

7. Always fill in meet entry forms with all details including DOB and ASA I.D Number. Failure to do this may result in your swimmer not being accepted for the meet. It is preferable if you pay by cheque or paypal as the payment can be traced.

8. Do not enter a swimmer for a meet if they have not gained the qualifying time or are too fast, you may lose your money.

9. Please volunteer to help at meets; it takes a lot of volunteers to run our Open Meets. These meets raise funds for the Club which help to keep the training fees at a reasonable level

10. It is a fact that swimmers may well be disqualified. Like all sports, competitive swimming has its own set of strict technical rules which are there to make sure that races are run completely fairly. Whilst it is obviously upsetting when DQs happen the club has to get the swimmers used to these rules from the start.

On the day of the Meet

Before the event itself you should remind yourself which events you’ve entered, you should also ensure that both you and your swimmer are prepared for a potentially long day at the pool. Make sure that both you and your swimmer have enough with you to drink, as swimming pools are invariably very hot places! You might regret wearing those jeans and jumper! You will also need to ensure you’ve planned lunch / snacks.

Also bring some pens to record times and maybe a highlighter pen so you can mark all their races.

Also check:
 You know where the venue is and how long it will take you to get there – the venue isn’t always the club’s home pool.
 The time of the warm-up
 The closing time for registration for each session
 The actual start time of each session

Be aware that there is a “warm up” swim at the beginning of each of the day’s sessions, and your swimmer will be expected to swim in each of these.

Having sent your swimmer off to their coach you’ll then make your way to the viewing gallery; if this is the first session of the day prepare for a long queue to get in! When you get to the front of the queue be prepared to part with more cash as you will likely be charged for entry and also for a programme. Bear in mind the entries fees and programmes can be specific to each session or day of the event.

What is meant by Level 1, 2, 3, 4 Meet?

Level 1

Meets at this level include long course National, Regional and County Championships.

Purpose: To enable athletes to achieve qualifying times suitable for entry into National, Regional and County Championships.

Pool Length – Long Course (50m) only. The pool measurement certificate has to be registered with the ASA.
Entry Criteria: A minimum qualifying time is required. Swimmers submitted entry time can be verified in Rankings and must be from level 1or 2 for National events and 1, 2 or 3 for Regional and County Championships.

County Championships and Open Meets may choose also to accept entry times from level 4 meets.

Events: Meets can be held at any time, subject to restrictions shown on the ASA Competition Calendar and below, and the programme must include at least one 400m event for each gender.

Meets in the qualifying period for the British Summer Championships must additionally include 800m and 1500m freestyle events on the programme.

Age Groups: Open Meets may choose as at 31st December in year of competition or age on the last day of the competition.

Minimum Age: 10 years if age as at 31st December, or 9 years if age on the last day of the competition.
Electronic Timing and anti-turbulence lane ropes are required.


Level 2

Meets at this level include short course National, Regional and County Championships.

Purpose: To enable athletes to achieve qualifying times suitable for entry into National, Regional and County Championships

Pool Length – Short Course (25m) only. The pool measurement certificate has to be registered with the ASA.

Entry Criteria: A minimum qualifying time is required. Swimmers submitted entry time can be verified in Rankings and must be from level 1or 2 for National events and 1, 2 or 3 for Regional and County Championships.

County Championships and Open Meets may choose also to accept entry times from level 4 meets.

Events: Meets can be held at any time, subject to restrictions shown on the ASA Competition Calendar and below, and the programme must include at least one 400m event for each gender.

Age Groups: Open Meets may choose as at 31st December in year of competition or age on the last day of the competition.
Minimum Age: 10 years if age as at 31st December, or 9 years if age on the last day of the competition.

Electronic Timing and anti-turbulence lane ropes are required.

Level 3

Purpose: To enable athletes to achieve times suitable for entry into Regional and County Championships and other Meets at Level 1 or Level 2.

Pool Length- Long Course (50m) or Short Course (25m)

Qualification Standards. Upper cut-off times are required for entry, and lower qualifying times may be set.

All entrants registered as Category Two members

Events: Varied range of Strokes and Distances is recommended
Age Groups: As at 31st December in year of competition or age on the last day of the competition.

Minimum Age: 10 years if age as at 31st December, or 9 years if age on the last day of the Competition, except for single club competitions, when ASA Law applies.

Electronic Timing is required.

Level 4

Exceptionally, Open Meets which are not Levels 1, 2 or 3, (e.g. Borough Championships), and events meeting the ASA criteria for a Low Level Competition which are:
A single club competition restricted to its members (as in Club Championships and Time Trials), or
Inter-club competitions providing:
 The event does not include more than eight clubs.
 The participating clubs must be invited by the promoter to take part in the event.
 The promoter has supplied the conditions for the event.
 The whole event takes place in one pool on one occasion and does not form a series of events, the results of which are aggregated or considered together to decide the eventual winner.

Purpose: For the development of inexperienced athletes and those seeking to compete outside their own club environment. Times recorded are suitable for entry into County Championships where acceptable to the County concerned, and Meets at Level 3.
 Level 4 times are not acceptable for entry into Regional and National Events.
Pool Length – Any pool length 25m or greater. Times will go into Rankings as Short Course for pools less than 50m

Open to Category One or Two swimmers as appropriate to the competition. Events: Varied Range of strokes and distances is recommended

Age Groups: As at 31st December in year of competition or age on the last day of the competition.

Minimum Age: as specified in ASA Law appropriate to the competition.

Electronic Timing recommended but not essential.
ASA LICENCING CRITERIA

What is DQ?

Unfortunately this means disqualified. At the end of a pool there are time keepers, recording a final time achieved by the swimmer, by the side of the pool walking up and down are Judges. If a Judge observes a swimming that has infringed the rules this will result in a DQ.

The Results Report will show a DQ when a swimmer has been disqualified and, where possible, includes details of the reason for disqualification. The fact of disqualification is usually indicated on results pages by annotating the result with ‘DQ’ or with a more specific disqualification code.

If a swimmer is disqualified then he will be given no time on the results. Any time recorded by the timekeeper will not be treated as an official time and cannot be used as a qualifying time for any event.

Click here to check the FINA Swimming Rules

What is PB?

PB – means your ‘Personal Best’ time for an event.

How can I find out my PB s?

Click here for a link to the ASA website, pop in your name and they have a record of all your PBs

British swimming Personal best times (Find your PB’s here)

What are all the kit items?

SWIMMING KIT

PULL BUOY

PULLBUOY
A pull buoy or leg float is a figure-eight shaped piece of closed-cell foam used in swim workouts. Swimmers place the buoy between the legs – between their thighs or their ankles – to provide support to the body without kicking the legs; this allows the swimmer to focus on training only their arms and developing both endurance and upper body strength.

SMALL KICK BOARD

KICKBOARD
Kick boards are a flotation aid used to develop a swimmer’s kicking action. They can be used on all strokes but are primarily used on Freestyle, Butterfly stroke and Breaststroke.

Swimmers of all ability can use them. Young swimmers can develop their kicking action while elite swimmers can refine their kick. They are also used to strengthen a swimmers legs.

FINS

FINSFins are used to develop leg strength, kicking with fins is like lifting weights: the added resistance of the water on the blade of the fin increases the workload on your leg muscles. They also increase ankle flexibility and help improve body position and technique.  Fins add extra propulsion to the stroke, which increases a swimmer’s speed through the water. Good swimmers tend to plane on top of the water while poor swimmers tend to drag their legs and swim in a more vertical position slowing them down

 

HAND PADDLES

HANDPADDLE
A hand paddle is a device worn by swimmers during training. It consists of a curved plastic plate worn over the swimmer’s palm and attached over the back of the swimmer’s hand with elastic cords. The plate is often perforated with a pattern of holes

 

FINGER PADDLESFINGERPADDLES

 

Finger paddles are designed to fit on your fingers and can be used for all strokes

FULCRUM
FULCRUM

The Fulcrum is a swim training aid that will teach an Early
Vertical Forearm (EVF) which improves your technique to develop a proper stroke
pull that will utilise your entire forearm. Using the fulcrum
increases muscle memory of the proper position for your hand, wrist and forearm
and will help your stroke to be more efficient from beginning to end.  Used for
all four competitive swim strokes.

 

SNORKEL

SNORKELThe training snorkel is used in swimming training to improve
their swim stroke technique and help them to correctly align their body and head
position in the water without having to worry about their breathing technique.

 

 

MESH EQUIPMENT BAG

MESH
Mesh equipment bags are used to transport and store all your swimming kit that gets used in the pool – the mesh helps with drainage as it can often get quite wet!

 

 

 

SWIMMING CAP

CAP2

The Portsmouth Northsea swimming cap can be purchased from the club shop.
Club Shop

 

 

 

What qualifying times do I need to meet for County, Regional, National Championships?

QUALIFYING TIMES

 

South East Region Swimming Championships 2016

Regional Qualifying Times 2016

Hampshire County Swimming Championships 2016

HCASA Qualifying Times 2016

Hampshire County Swimming Championships 2015

County Qualifying Times 2015

Meet Information

 

South East Region Youth Championships 2015

Regional Qualifying Times 2015

Meet Information

 

SOUTH ZONAL QUALIFYING TIMES

South Zonal Qualifying Times 2015

Meet Information

 

BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIPS QUALIFYING TIMES

British Championships Qualifying Times 2015

Meet Information

 

BRITISH SWIMMING SUMMER CHAMPIONSHIPS

28 – July – 2 August 2015 to be held at Ponds Forge, Sheffield

Meet Information

 

ASA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS QUALIFYING TIMES

4 – 9 August 2015 to be held at Ponds Forge, Sheffield

Details to follow

 

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